Breast milk is best for your baby

Breast milk is best for babies. The World Health Organisation (WHO) and Health Promotion Board (HPB) recommend exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life. Unnecessary introduction of bottle feeding or other food and drinks will have a negative impact on breastfeeding. At around six months of age (but not before 4 months), infants should receive nutritionally adequate and age-appropriate complementary foods while breastfeeding continues for up to two years of age or beyond. Consult your doctor before deciding to use infant formula or if you have difficulty breastfeeding.

Abbott Singapore fully recognises breast milk’s primacy, value and superiority and supports exclusive breastfeeding as recommended by the WHO.

The content on this website is intended as general information for Singaporean residents only and should not be used as a substitute for medical care and advice from your healthcare practitioner. The HPB recommends that infants start on age-appropriate complementary foods at around 6 months, whilst continuing breastfeeding for up to 2 years or beyond to meet their evolving nutritional requirements. If no longer breastfeeding, toddlers can switch to full cream milk after 12 months. This should be complemented by a good variety of solid foods from the four main food groups (fruits, vegetables, grains, meat and alternatives). For more information on the nutritional requirements of infants and young children, please visit www.healthhub.sg/earlynutrition.

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SECOND TRIMESTER / WEEK 19

19th Week of Pregnancy

New Foods and New Moves
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Baby's Growth and Development at 19 Weeks Pregnant

During the weeks before, during, and after your 19th week of pregnancy, your baby’s brain develops at a phenomenal rate. Other systems continue to grow.

  • Your baby now measures about 6 inches, or the length of a summer squash.
  • When you’re 19 weeks pregnant, your baby’s brain develops millions of motor neurons. Neurons are nerves that help muscles in the brain communicate. This new and ongoing development means your baby can make purposeful and involuntary movements. She can suck her thumb, move her head, or make other moves that you might start to feel.
  • Your baby’s hearing is even more developed when you’re 19 weeks pregnant. She probably can hear external sounds and conversation by this time, or will very soon. Your voice is the most pronounced. She can hear you talk, hum, and sing!
  • Your baby’s skin is covered in a white, waxy, protective coating called vernix.
  • Under the vernix, the fine hair called lanugo continues to cover her skin.
  • By your 19th week of pregnancy, your baby’s kidneys function. Her urine is excreted into your amniotic sac, the bag of fluid in your uterus that contains your baby and amniotic fluid. Your placenta then removes the waste.
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Your Changing Body at 19 Weeks Pregnant

During your 19th week of pregnancy and the weeks surrounding this time, your body continues to change and adapt to accommodate your baby’s current growth and future needs.

  • Your body makes more blood.
  • Your circulatory system expands and keeps blood pressure lower than normal. As a result, you might get dizzy, lightheaded, nauseated, or faint if you stand or rise too quickly.
  • Around your 19th week of pregnancy, you might experience nasal congestion, nosebleeds, and headaches due to increased blood flow. Learn how to treat nasal issues.
  • You also might encounter tender or bleeding gums. Learn about dental care during pregnancy.
  • At 19 weeks pregnant, your lung capacity continues to increase. You might breathe faster or experience shortness of breath.
  • Your breast cup size increases around your 19th week of pregnancy due to enlarging milk-duct glands and increasing blood flow.
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Wellness and Nutrition at 19 Weeks Pregnant

At 19 weeks pregnant, keep nutrition and exercise interesting and fun. Introduce some new foods and new moves.

Fat Is Your Friend

Exercise: Keep It Fresh.