Breast milk is best for your baby

Breast milk is best for babies. The World Health Organisation (WHO) and Health Promotion Board (HPB) recommend exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life. Unnecessary introduction of bottle feeding or other food and drinks will have a negative impact on breastfeeding. At around six months of age (but not before 4 months), infants should receive nutritionally adequate and age-appropriate complementary foods while breastfeeding continues for up to two years of age or beyond. Consult your doctor before deciding to use infant formula or if you have difficulty breastfeeding.

Abbott Singapore fully recognises breast milk’s primacy, value and superiority and supports exclusive breastfeeding as recommended by the WHO.

The content on this website is intended as general information for Singaporean residents only and should not be used as a substitute for medical care and advice from your healthcare practitioner. The HPB recommends that infants start on age-appropriate complementary foods at around 6 months, whilst continuing breastfeeding for up to 2 years or beyond to meet their evolving nutritional requirements. If no longer breastfeeding, toddlers can switch to full cream milk after 12 months. This should be complemented by a good variety of solid foods from the four main food groups (fruits, vegetables, grains, meat and alternatives). For more information on the nutritional requirements of infants and young children, please visit www.healthhub.sg/earlynutrition.

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FIRST TRIMESTER / WEEK 11

11th Week of Pregnancy

Are You Glowing Yet?
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Baby's Growth and Development at 11 Weeks Pregnant

By the 11th week of your pregnancy, all of your baby’s organs are in place. She’s ready to focus on growth, growth, growth! At 11 weeks pregnant:

  • When you’re 11 weeks pregnant, your baby is about 1½ inches long, about the length of your thumb from the knuckle to the tip.
  • From now until your halfway mark at 20 weeks of pregnancy, your baby will increase her weight by 30% and probably will triple in length.
  • The blood vessels in your placenta grow larger to prepare for this time of accelerated growth in your baby.
  • During the 11th week of your pregnancy, your baby's ears move to their permanent position.
  • Your baby's reproductive organs are developing. But it’s still a little early to find out whether it’s a girl or boy — gender isn’t clear on ultrasound until between the 16th and 20th weeks of pregnancy.
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Your Changing Body at 11 Weeks Pregnant

During your 11th week of pregnancy, your baby begins to grow more rapidly and your body keeps on adjusting to the changes ahead.

  • Pregnancy glow? Yes, it's real! You've heard that expectant mothers almost glow and you might be experiencing this yourself. This "glow" is thanks to your increased blood volume, which can cause skin to look slightly flushed and full. In addition, your body's hormones increase the amount of oils on your face, causing skin to look smoother with a slight shine. At this point you might want to consider switching to oil-free skin products, if you haven’t already.
  • Your uterus continues to expand during the 11th week of pregnancy to accommodate your baby's increasing size. You might even experience light twinges as this expansion continues.
  • By the 11th week of pregnancy many of the early symptoms of pregnancy, such as nausea, might be less severe.
  • Acne also can be an issue for pregnant women. As your body's increased oils provide your pleasant pregnancy glow, they also leave you more susceptible to acne. The good news? It's only temporary and should disappear after you give birth.

Dealing With Acne During Pregnancy

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Wellness and Nutrition at 11 Weeks Pregnant

When you’re 11 weeks pregnant, eating healthy, exercising regularly, and resting still top the list for keeping you and your baby healthy. And it’s OK to be tired or feel exhausted — most women are more tired than usual while they’re pregnant. Your body works hard to produce hormones and more blood to support your baby's developing body. And your body's high level of progesterone directly impacts how sleepy you are.

Here are a few tips for fighting fatigue: