Breast milk is best for your baby

Breast milk is best for babies. The World Health Organisation (WHO) and Health Promotion Board (HPB) recommend exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life. Unnecessary introduction of bottle feeding or other food and drinks will have a negative impact on breastfeeding. At around six months of age (but not before 4 months), infants should receive nutritionally adequate and age-appropriate complementary foods while breastfeeding continues for up to two years of age or beyond. Consult your doctor before deciding to use infant formula or if you have difficulty breastfeeding.

Abbott Singapore fully recognises breast milk’s primacy, value and superiority and supports exclusive breastfeeding as recommended by the WHO.

The content on this website is intended as general information for Singaporean residents only and should not be used as a substitute for medical care and advice from your healthcare practitioner. The HPB recommends that infants start on age-appropriate complementary foods at around 6 months, whilst continuing breastfeeding for up to 2 years or beyond to meet their evolving nutritional requirements. If no longer breastfeeding, toddlers can switch to full cream milk after 12 months. This should be complemented by a good variety of solid foods from the four main food groups (fruits, vegetables, grains, meat and alternatives). For more information on the nutritional requirements of infants and young children, please visit www.healthhub.sg/earlynutrition.

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Your 8-month-old baby

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Ready to move in new ways, your baby gets ready to cruise.

This month, your 8-month old is crawling, cruising, and experimenting with all-new ways to explore the world around her. When your baby is standing, encourage her by holding her favorite toy just out of reach and getting her to “cruise” along the furniture to get it.

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Time to mix it up and introduce new foods.

Month 6 is a good time to consider introducing new foods in addition to breast milk, such as:

  • Small amounts of soft pasteurized cheese, yogurt, or cottage cheese. However, try to avoid cow’s milk until age 1 or until your child’s healthcare provider gives you the OK.
  • Iron-fortified cereals such as rice, barley, wheat, oats, and mixed cereals.
  • Mashed fruits and vegetables such as bananas, peaches, pears, avocados, cooked carrots, squash, white potatoes, and sweet potatoes.
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Eight months old, and ready to roll.

All babies develop at different rates. You should not be concerned if your baby does something later or earlier than your friend's children. In general, by the end of your baby's eighth month, she will likely be able to do the following:

  • Crawl
  • “Inspect” toys
  • Say “dada” without necessarily knowing what it means
  • Move from laying on her stomach to a sitting position
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Reaching beyond – helping your 8-month-old learn new skills

Simple and effective, these techniques can help you keep baby entertained and help her grow strong:

  • Encourage her to bounce up and down while supporting her in a standing position (This is great fun)
  • Help your baby stand when she is near a stable, sturdy object, urging him to use it for balance (Once she is able to pull up to stand in her crib, make sure the mattress is in the lowest setting for safety)
  • When your baby is standing, hold her favorite toy just out of reach and try to get her to "cruise" along the furniture to get the toy
  • Place a toy out of reach and encourage her to get the toy by crawling on her hands and knees
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Bedtime made easy – creating rituals for restful nights

Near the end of this first year, it's a great time to create more involved bedtime rituals, such as reading the same book to him that your mother read you, rocking, or doing quiet activities together.

While it only takes 10 to 30 minutes, your bedtime ritual will help your baby look forward to bedtime, and find it easier to accept the separation from you when you finally leave the room. So that he'll be comfortable with anyone putting him to bed, it's good to involve loved ones early.

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