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Now Enhanced with Intelli-Pro™
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As a mum, you want to give your baby the best in life. Now, what better time to start when your precious one is still little? The first few years are the most important when your baby learns about the world he lives in. And this is when you really want to spend quality time building the right foundation for your baby.

Similac Follow-on is now enhanced with Intelli-Pro™, with higher Lutein* and DHA to help with brain and eye development. Formulated for nutrient absorption, Similac Follow-on contains Lutein, DHA, AA, Taurine and Choline in a unique lipid blend that is Palm Olein Free.

Breast milk is the best and is recommended for as long as possible during infancy. If breastfeeding is not adopted, Similac Follow-on is formulated for infant feeding after 6 months and may be recommended by a doctor.

 
 
  • EyeQ Plus system of nutrients includes Intelli-Pro, AA, Omega 3 & 6, taurine, choline and iron
  • Intelli-Pro is a unique combination of Lutein and DHA; Lutein is an integral part of the eye's retina and DHA is a building block for brain and eye development
  • Omega 3 & 6 are precursors of DHA & AA, which are building blocks for brain and eye development
  • Taurine helps support overall mental and physical development.
  • Choline supports overall mental functioning
 
 
 
  • 3-way Shield System with nucleotides, prebiotics and antioxidants
  • Includes beta-carotene, selenium, vitamins A, C and E
  • Zinc and iron to support your child's natural defenses
 
 
 
  • Unique, easily digested vegetable fat blend without palm olein oil
  • Calcium to support the development of strong bones and teeth
  • Vitamin D to help support calcium absorption and improve bone strength
 
Comparison with
other major brands
DHA / AA
Added Lutein
OVER +80% more*
 
Prebiotics
Unique Vegetable Fat Blend Without Palm Olein Oil
 
Request for Free Sample Click to Purchase
*Compared to previous formulation.
#Based on Nielsen Singapore Market Track for Infant Milk segment for the period ending December 2012.

Nutrition Chart:

**Standard reconstitution is one level scoop (enclosed in tin) of powder for each 60 mL (2 oz) of water, or 152 g of powder diluted to 1 liter in water.

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The first three years of life are critical to the development of the brain. During this stage, it is important that toddlers are provided with the essential nutrients and energy to support growth and brain development.

Similac Gain is now enhanced with Intelli-Pro™, with higher Lutein* and DHA to help with brain and eye development. Formulated for nutrient absorption,
Similac Gain contains Lutein, DHA, AA, Taurine and Choline in a unique lipid blend that is Palm Olein Free.

 
 
  • EyeQ Plus system of nutrients includes Intelli-Pro, AA, Omega 3 & 6, taurine, choline and iron
  • Intelli-Pro is a unique combination of Lutein and DHA; Lutein is an integral part of the eye's retina and DHA is a building block for brain and eye development
  • Omega 3 & 6 are precursors of DHA & AA, which are building blocks for brain and eye development
  • Taurine helps support overall mental and physical development.
  • Choline supports overall mental functioning
 
 
 
  • 3-way Shield System with nucleotides, prebiotics and antioxidants
  • Includes beta-carotene, selenium, vitamins A, C and E
  • Zinc and iron to support your child's natural defenses
 
 
 
  • Unique, easily digested vegetable fat blend without palm olein oil
  • Calcium to support the development of strong bones and teeth
  • Vitamin D to help support calcium absorption and improve bone strength
 
Comparison with
other major brands
DHA / AA
Added Lutein
OVER +80% more*
 
Prebiotics
Unique Vegetable Fat Blend Without Palm Olein Oil
 
Request for Free Sample Click to Purchase
*Compared to previous formulation.
#Based on Nielsen Singapore Market Track for Growing-up Milk segment for the period ending December 2012.

SIMILAC GAIN
NUTRITION CHART:

**Standard reconstitution is one level scoop (enclosed in tin) of powder for each 60 mL (2 oz) of water, or 152 g of powder diluted to 1 liter in water.

Close

During the developmental years, it is crucial that pre-schoolers are provided with all the essential nutrients and energy to support growth and brain development, so they can learn and thrive.

Similac Gain Kid is now enhanced with Intelli-Pro™, with higher Lutein* and DHA+ to help with brain and eye development. Formulated for nutrient absorption,
Similac Gain Kid contains Lutein, DHA+, AA, Taurine and Choline in a unique lipid blend that is Palm Olein Free.

 
 
  • EyeQ Plus system of nutrients includes Intelli-Pro, AA, Omega 3 & 6, taurine, choline and iron
  • Intelli-Pro is a unique combination of Lutein and DHA; Lutein is an integral part of the eye's retina
  • Omega 3 & 6 are precursors of DHA & AA
  • Taurine helps support overall mental and physical development.
  • Choline supports overall mental functioning
 
 
 
  • 3-way Shield System with nucleotides, prebiotics and antioxidants
  • Includes beta-carotene, selenium, vitamins A, C and E
  • Zinc and iron to support your child's natural defenses
 
 
 
  • Unique, easily digested vegetable fat blend without palm olein oil
  • Calcium to support the development of strong bones and teeth
  • Vitamin D to help support calcium absorption and improve bone strength
 
Comparison with
other major brands
DHA / AA
Added Lutein
OVER +80% more*
 
Prebiotics
Unique Vegetable Fat Blend Without Palm Olein Oil
 
Request for Free Sample Click to Purchase
*Compared to previous formulation.
+For children up to 3 years old.
#Based on Nielsen Singapore Market Track for Growing-up Milk segment for the period ending December 2012.

SIMILAC GAIN
NUTRITION CHART:

**Standard reconstitution is one level scoop (enclosed in tin) of powder for each 60 mL (2 oz) of water, or 152 g of powder diluted to 1 liter in water.

Close

  • Add complementary foods

    After 6 months, complementary foods are added to an infant's diet. It is at this point where infants make a gradual transition to eating family foods.

  • Introduce variety

    Complementary foods should be varied and include adequate quantities of meat, poultry, fish or eggs, as well as vitamin A. Cow's milk should not be introduced before 12 months of age.

  • Advance the texture

    As infants grow, the consistency of complementary foods should change from semi-solid to solid foods and the variety of foods offered should increase.

  • Transition to regular meals

    Offer meals 3-4 times per day at 12-24 months of age, with additional snacks offered 1-2 times per day, as desired. This transition from on-demand feeding to regular time-based meals is a slow one, and healthy snacks are important "mini-meals" as this change takes place.

  • Nutrient dense foods

    Growing toddlers and young children are active and their nutrient needs are high relative to their small stomach size. It is advisable to include milk products, as well as meat, poultry, fish or eggs, as well as fruits and vegetables to provide necessary vitamins. Toddlers should consume milk or other dairy products 2-3 times daily, and sweetened beverages should be limited.

  • Parents play a role

    With the introduction of new foods to an infant's diet, the feeding behavior of caregivers is important too. Young children need assistance that is appropriate for their age and developmental needs to ensure that they consume adequate amounts of complementary food.

Click here to learn more about
your child's growth and development.

The human brain undergoes rapid development during the first few years of life. By age 2, the brain will achieve 80% of its adult size and by 5 years of age, the brain is approximately 90% of its adult size. 1

A baby’s brain at birth contains an astounding 100 billion neurons (nerve cells). 2 Connections among neurons are formed as the growing child experiences the surrounding world – visual perception for example influences brain development, 3 since much of what we learn is based on what we see. Good eye health is therefore also important for the growing child. By age 2 or 3, there are about 15 000 connections per neuron, 2 creating complex information networks in the brain.

Proper nutrition certainly plays a critical role in supporting this dramatic growth in brain structure and function. Many different nutrients are needed for optimal brain and eye development. The key nutrients include:

  • DHA and AA

    DHA and AA are polyunsaturated fatty acids which make up crucial parts of cell membranes, particularly in the brain and retina (layer of tissue in the back of the eye responsible for vision). 4 Both DHA and AA occur naturally in breast milk, and they can also be produced in the body from omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.

  •  

  • Lutein

    Lutein is a carotenoid with antioxidant properties. It can only be obtained from the diet – good sources include green leafy vegetables, egg yolks and breast milk. Lutein accumulates in the retina of the eye, where it may offer protection in two ways: 5,6

    • Absorbs blue light, which is high in energy and can
    harm the retina
    • Protects the eyes from oxidative damage

    Recent research has shown that lutein is the predominant carotenoid in the infant brain. 7 Lutein was found to concentrate in key regions of the brain that regulate overall brain function, cognition, vision, hearing and speech. It may serve to protect DHA, which is vulnerable to oxidative damage. 8

  •  

  • Choline and Taurine

    Choline is required in the production of chemical messengers (neurotransmitters) which relay information between nerve cells. 9 Taurine may have a role in supporting normal vision and hearing development. 10

  • Iron and Zinc

    Iron is needed for energy metabolism in nerve cells and the production of neurotransmitters. 9 Zinc plays a part in the formation of neurons and enabling communication between nerve cells. 11

References
1. Lenroot RK, Giedd JN. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews.2006;30:718–729.
2. The University of Maine Cooperative Extension Publications. Children and brain development: what we know about how children learn. Available at http://umaine.edu/publications/4356e/ (accessed July 2013).
3. Farroni T, Menon E. Visual Perception and Early Brain Development. In: Trembley R, ed. Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development. 2008.
4. Ryan AS et al. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids. 2010; 82:305–314
5. Krinsky NI et al. Ann Rev Nutr. 2003;23:171-201.
6. Bone RA et al. Exp Eye Res. 1997;64:211-8.
7. Vishwanathan R et al. Acta Biologica Cracoviensia Series Botanica.2011; 53(suppl. 1).
8. Wang W et al. J. Alzheimers Dis. 2008;13:31-38.
9. Georgieff MK. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007;85(suppl):614S–20S.
10. Lourenço R, Camilo ME. Nutr Hosp. 2002; 17:262-270.
11. Nyaradi A et al. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 2013;7:1-16.



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